SAM ANDERSON ON WILLIAM T. VOLLMAN

One reason why Sam Anderson over at New York magazine is great:

I was sitting on the train one day chipping away at William T. Vollmann’s latest slab of obsessional nonfiction when my friend Tsia, who incidentally is not an underage Thai street whore, offered to save me time with a blurby one-sentence review based entirely on the book’s cover and my synopsis of its first 50 pages. “Just write that it’s like Robert Caro’s The Power Broker,” she said, “but with the attitude of Mike Davis’s City of Quartz.” This struck me as good advice, and I was all set to take it, but as I worked my way through the book’s final 1,250 pages, I found I had to modify it, slightly, to read as follows: Imperial is like Robert Caro’s The Power Broker with the attitude of Mike Davis’s City of Quartz, if Robert Caro had been raised in an abandoned grain silo by a band of feral raccoons, and if Mike Davis were the communications director of a heavily armed libertarian survivalist cult, and if the two of them had somehow managed to stitch John McPhee’s cortex onto the brain of a Gila monster, which they then sent to the Mexican border to conduct ten years of immersive research, and also if they wrote the entire manuscript on dried banana leaves with a toucan beak dipped in hobo blood, and then the book was line-edited during a 36-hour peyote séance by the ghosts of John Steinbeck, Jack London, and Sinclair Lewis, with 200 pages of endnotes faxed over by Henry David Thoreau’s great-great-great-great grandson from a concrete bunker under a toxic pond behind a maquiladora, and if at the last minute Herman Melville threw up all over the manuscript, rendering it illegible, so it had to be re-created from memory by a community-theater actor doing his best impression of Jack Kerouac. With photographs by Dorothea Lange. (Viking has my full blessing to use that as a blurb.)

This lone, scene-stealing paragraph about "Imperial", Vollman's latest brick ("He is the maximalist’s maximalist," Anderson continues, "a PEZ dispenser of career-capping megavolumes"), has been making the rounds among some of my literary-minded friends, only one of whom admitted to actually finishing a Vollman volume: "Whores For Gloria". He then wrote: "my Dad claims to have read all of "You Bright and Risen Angels," but I think he's fudging."

The Anderson review is favourable by the end. It's also worth checking out Charles McGrath's profile of the slightly spooky Vollman in the New York Times. The Economist's Books and Arts section will feature a review in the next issue.

~ EMILY BOBROW